mercoledì 24 giugno 2015

Interview with Martin Lukáč









q)Walk us through an intimate day in your life


a)Whoa. It really depends. I´m still a student of Academy of Arts, architecture and Design in Prague. So that means I have some duties there. But my days are different. I will try to catch here my favourite routine.
When I wake up I’m thinking of making art. You know. Simultaneously I’m making a smoothie from fresh fruit and vegetable. Base is apple and carrot. After classically I'm checking emails and drinking coffee. Next step is going to studio (in school) or sometimes I draw at home or at particular spaces. (Nature, China Town, pub...) Mostly I draw. But I have some days or weeks of doing nothing.
At the early evening I´m checking some openings what are coming up. Then I go home and watch my favourite series, or read book or something till I fall asleep. I’m a pretty big geek. Actually this semester I was travelling pretty much from Prague to Leipzig. I ordered plenty stuff from KFC and then I ate it, while I was travelling to Germany. So it was colourful: D. I had a great time there on academy. And that are best spended days for me sometimes. Traveling, knowing people... My days are different I´m not daily only at studio. Sometimes on trips like these, I made the best ideas in my mind. I will try travel more in future, for sure.


q) Where did you grow up/where do you live now and how does that contribute to your art?


a)I grew up in Slovakia - it is located in central Europe. Of course it was part of eastern communist block back than (26 years ago). For sure it influenced all my stuff I do. I grew up in 90 ´s in capital city - Bratislava. Imagine that, you see graffiti on “panelocks “and old socialistic weird sculptures. Everywhere was signs like “Rap” or “Prodigy” or “WTC” or painted Michael Jordan. That is awesome stuff for kid to follow. I saw for my very first time cartoon network back then, when I moved to the capital city. Because my parents lived in smaller village and I had some problems like asthma. Because of that we moved. Moving to smog Bratislava cured me. Unbelievable! J
Actually for my studies I went to Czech Republic specifically to Prague. It was Czechoslovak capitol. (26 years ago) As I mentioned I study here at the Academy and now I’m on exchange in Germany (Leipzig). I have made some series of painting based on socialistic realism. I used plaster, chemical paints and burlap -it is more like assemblage. Also the influence is in the utterance of gullibility and modernism of socialistic realism. These days I´m exhibiting things influenced more by fashion and classically I´m expressing myself by drawing so... It is kind a Mixture of various stuff that I follow these days. Currently I´m living in Leipzig and in Prague


q) What is your earliest memory that propelled you to create?


a)Batman, Batman, Batman! Specifically Cartoon network series or Frank Millers comics strip, I think those two things are the thing what are you asking for.


q) Tell us a little bit about your creative process.


a)Mainly I’m having ideas or visions first. That’s base. And the second thing is drawing
I draw sometimes I feel like I´m out of my mind because of it. But for sure drawing is my creative process number one. The Process is mostly spontaneous it depends how did I figure the concept/content.



q) How do you wish for your art to be perceived?


a)I don’t have any particular wishes about this. It is just so free. I hope.
Often every exhibition of mine has its own kind of statement- content. You can read it freely I think. There is no super specific clue (I don’t count curatorial text).


q) What do your internal dialogues sound like?


a)Hah! It is a normal questioning what is good and what not. What shapes, what colours, why am I doing it? Mostly is like... is that enough on the edge? (When I do some drawing/exhibition/painting)

q) Do you feel that there are limitations to what you want to create?


a)I create my own limits. There are only those limits which is my mind having right now. I think limits are important. You have to know them. Know Yourself.


q) Do you feel art is vital to survival and if so, why?


a)We have art since beginning of the entire planet. I have no doubts that it will be forever like Wu- tang J


q) Describe a world without art.


a)Lots of douchebags on streets without any other goal than survive  J ? I kind of don’t know how to imagine that. Art is everywhere, architecture, traffic signs everything. It is a life style.


q) Tell us a secret, and obsession.


a)KFC. J Family Guy JBatman J


q) Where can people see more of your work on the internet?


a)Lately I have been working on new web-design of my own page. It will be improved by Martin Groch a great illustrator and designer. He is making me new cool portfolio. It will be finished in one month from now on. I think you will be surprised J it is lukacmartin.com and lukacmartin.tumblr.com you can also see my work at PITCH magazine or http://inspoboard.sample-mag.com/. Some stuff
Is on pages of particular galleries where I did exhibit previously. But mainly check out my web and Tumblr Folks! Thanks For interview!!!
Martin


lunedì 18 maggio 2015

Interview with MATHIEU ST-PIERRE






q)Walk us through an intimate day in your life

a)On weekends I usually wake up late as I'm really not a morning person. I have breakfast and make sure to have a minimum of 2 cups of coffee before working on anything. Then, slowly in the afternoon I gather some videos I start downloading from various torrent sites. From there, I just spend the rest of the day working on various stuff at work... After dinner, this is when I really get into my glitch work, I'm not a night owl but I'm an evening person. I'd say that around 10pm I get most of my inspiration as I try to create as much as possible saving a large number of images I extract from my videos.

q) Where did you grow up/where do you live now and how does that contribute to your art? I grew up in Montreal, Canada

a)where I stayed until my 30th birthday. From there, I moved to South Korea where I currently live. I can say it was the best move I've ever done in my life (so far), living in Korea is great because I'm pretty much the only artist here working on glitch art as everyone else is focusing on more traditional for of art. Back in Montreal I think the art scene is too small and artists are struggling (even the famous local ones). Being in Asia is such a culture clash that it helps my creativity.

q) What is your earliest memory that propelled you to create?

a)Having a good assortment of video files is the most important, then some music + imported beer helps in the creative process.

q) Tell us a little bit about your creative process.

a)I generally browse the torrent sites in search of good videos that I can easily glitch. I'd say that adult files are generally more abundant and comes in a fairly large variety of codecs, which makes them interesting to work with. From there I break the files to get errors when reading and I then stack them in an editing program. After that I try to accentuate those imperfections by adding up filters in a way that is not meant to be.

q) How do you wish for your art to be perceived?

a)I like my work to be open to interpretations. Recently, a student from Sweden wrote a Master's and included my work in her thesis, I was surprised about how she perceived my art and was also interested on how she could see different things from other people who reviewed my work previously.


q) What do your internal dialogues sound like?

a)These days my internal dialogue is telling me that I'm not patient enough. I do have absolutely no patience with my computer these days since it's too slow and I also want my art to get to a higher level of recognition faster.

q) Do you feel that there are limitations to what you want to create?

a)Yes, especially these days, that's why I recently purchased a custom electronic device that distorts analog signals. I'll eventually integrate that to my workflow and see how it will go.

q) Do you feel art is vital to survival and if so, why?

a)Perhaps not to the very basic of survival but on a higher level yes. It keeps a society critical.

q) Describe a world without art.

a)A world without a soul

q) Tell us a secret, and obsession.

a)I would love to have my work displayed in a museum one day.

q) Where can people see more of your work on the internet?




martedì 3 febbraio 2015

Interview with Valerio Eliogabalo Torrisi






q) Where did you grow up/where do you live now and how does that contribute to your art?


a)  I was born in Catania, where I'm currently living (in a small town called Riposto). I don't really think  that the place where I live had ever contribute to my art. Instead  I think that the place where I live doesn't give me opportunities to grow up with my art, it's so difficult to be an artist here. I lived for 11 month in Isla De Margarita, in Venezuela and I think  that this had contribute to create my personality as an artist because before I went to Venezuela I only "played" with the camera and I almost droved. In Margarita I attended an art school and this allowed me to discover my purpose in life.


q) What is your earliest memory that propelled you to create?


a)Drawing has always been my passion. I was also passionate about creating things using any kind of material. I had my first camera when I was 16. My earliest memory in photography, the first photographic project that I consider worthy of note , was a project with a Venezuelan girl . I loved fashion photography , but then I realized that I preferred other genres . Obviously the first best pictures I took , were nature photography of the Caribbean's landscapes.


q) Tell us a little bit about your creative process.

a) I work so much with my fantasy. When someone tell me a story, when I see a particular color  or a particular scene in the everyday life, I use to imagine a story behind what I see. Then I memorize as much details as I can, and I elaborate them in something new: I create a photo in my mind. Sometimes I need to do a comp, because I love to create all the scene by myself, so I need to have all clear in my mind.


q) How do you wish for your art to be perceived?

a)  I don't know how my art is perceived , but I hope my work give something to everyone watch them. I hope they tell something to their hearts, like a film, or a book. I always try to tell a story. Most of those stories are true.


q) Do you feel that there are limitations to what you want to create?


a) The biggest limitation is my camera: I work with a Nikon D3000, that is the basic Reflex Camera.
Sometimes is so difficult to create what you create in your mind, if you don't have the right material.


q) Do you feel art is vital to survival and if so, why?


a) I think art is vital, because I live with art everyday. Everyday I need to see something new, new photos, new videos, new artists. Is like oxygen.  I know it would sound like something strange, but without oxygen nobody can live. The same is with art to me. Is like an eternal  Stendhal Syndrome: if I don't live with art "life for me dries up , I  walk fearing to fall" .


q) Tell us a secret, and obsession.


a) I don't think I have big secrets, because I live with many obsessions, but this is not a secret for anybody.


q) Where can people see more of your work on the internet?




mercoledì 4 giugno 2014

Interview with ALESSANDRO RIPANE

 





q)Walk us through an intimate day in your life
 
 
a)It's the classic life of a regular illustrator I guess: adventure, fast
cars, beautiful women, richness!
No, I'm kidding, actually I spend the most of the day drawing or working
on my computer.
 
 
q) Where did you grow up/where do you live now and how does that
contribute to your art?
 
 
a)At the moment I live in Genova (I also born there), but I lived for a
period in Sweden, and I think that the place could influence a lot your
approach to your work, even if searching through my works there's not so
much of Genova inside.
 
 
q) What is your earliest memory that propelled you to create?
 
 
a)I recently found an old sketchbook from when I was around 5 years old, I
think it's that one the oldest memory I have: me, in the kitchen, drawing
wild animals (or dinosaurs, as long as they're big and wild and
dangerous).
 
 
q) Tell us a little bit about your creative process.
 
 
a)Actually there are no big secrets about the creative process that I
follow, it's much more boring than you thought!
 
 
q) How do you wish for your art to be perceived?
 
 
a)I don't know, probably in the most ironic way you can perceive some comics
about a "vegetarian penis".
 
 
q) What do your internal dialogues sound like?
 
 
a)Something like this:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eDzBpQ0GcoU
 
 
q) Do you feel that there are limitations to what you want to create?
 
 
a)I don't really understand this question, but I guess "no" it's the correct
answer.
 
 
q) Do you feel art is vital to survival and if so, why?
 
 
a)It depends what you mean with the word "art".
 
 
q) Describe a world without art.
 
 
a)I can't answer, but I can describe you my world without art, and I imagine
it like a world where I have no excuses when someone ask me "Why don't you
practice sport anymore?".
 
 
q) Tell us a secret, and obsession.
 
 
a)Secret: I really hate flying on aeroplanes, I consider planes as my worst
enemies.
Obsession: parmigiana di melanzane, a traditional dish from the South of
Italy.
 
 
q) Where can people see more of your work on the internet?
 
 
a)You can see my works on www.alessandroripane.com!


mercoledì 16 aprile 2014

Interview with ROMAN PYATKOVKA






q)Walk us through an intimate day in your life.

a)It was quite a long time ago.  My friend and teacher, famous photographer Boris Mikhailov (winner of Hasselblad prize) used to constantly criticize my works, even tear them down. Once I made a very intimate project “Adultery”. It was dedicated to the theme of evolution of the psychology of a man living two lives – one with his wife and another with his mistress. Boris looked at it very precisely, then he hugged me and congratulated with a great job.

q)Where did you grow up/where do you live now and how does that contribute to your art?

a)I was born and still live in Kharkiv. I identify with the Kharkiv School of Photography’s middle generation. This was the generation that debuted in the 1980s. It had no official recognition or state support. Consequently, our esthetics has been largely driven by the desire to be an artist in hostile circumstances. The lack of photo studios meant we had to turn to our private space, where our tiny apartments, our personal and even intimate life became the proving grounds for our art. The unavailability of high-quality equipment and materials led to the emergence of “poor quality” as an esthetic category. The absence of any formal education, funnily enough, made photographic art more intellectual, produced as it was by humanists and assorted freethinkers. Our existence outside the socialist context critically distanced us from the Soviet art system and the political structure in general.

q)What is your earliest memory that propelled you to create?

a)I was nurtured in a very intelligent family. Since childhood I was deeply interested in music, dances, I was spending a lot of my time on reading, movies and theatre. While I was in my adolescent ages film directing and acting classes were absorbing all my time. Thus I can say that since my childhood I was into the creativity.

q)Tell us a little bit about your creative process.

a)My art is a three-way junction of ideologized Sots Art, deeply private conceptualism, and frighteningly simple realism.
As an artist, I study personal relationships in various social environments. Sometimes a snapshot is just raw material, and I come up with a complex system of image processing to turn a realistic photograph into an epic installation. I use individual shots like puzzle pieces to create a single picture, a single exhibit-worthy organism.

q)How do you wish for your art to be perceived?

a)I would like my works to be interpreted by recipients. With new project I create my own secret language. The code to it lies in sensitivity. It is crucial for the recipient to feel firstly, and through that feeling to comprehend my art.

q)What do your internal dialogues sound like?

a)I am in the constant search for the striking and actual ideas that will touch everybody. I suggest letting go of the purported credibility of a captured fact and rewriting, reimagining events through the prism of personal experiences, which are always true, being given us here and now. Contemporary photography is a reflection of social relations and a study of life’s various facets. A contemporary artist is a blend of the social and the personal in exact proportions.

q)Do you feel that there are limitations to what you want to create?

a)I understand that I irritate a lot of people because of the provocative character of my pictures. They are brutal, scandalous and erotic. And people tend to so called mental inertia, thus are used to clichés in art. 
If a person spends all his life on fashion magazines, Hollywood movies and visits of the photo amateurs forums it is normal that one’s taste is in a very poor level. As result – people do not understand contemporary art. It is common today that people, without any qualification and education, let themselves judge contemporary art.
My art is not a pop-culture, it is not for big auditory. I understand that there won’t be big lines for my exhibitions.
Do I have any taboo? Yes. In 1988 I made one of the biggest mistakes in my professional life. I created erotic pictures with using religious symbols. It was not made on purpose, I just thought that it will work. It affected my personal life in a very negative way. So I have promised myself not to sin in art.

q)Do you feel art is vital to survival and if so, why?

a)I believe that contemporary art, as it is today, has to be in high demand. It gives visual picture of all the contradictions between political and social institutes. Today an artist is the one who has to ring the bells of liberty and democracy.

q)Describe a world without art.

a)As a famous French novelist Honore de Balzac once said, “All humanity is passion; without passion, religion, history, novels, art would be ineffectual”. I couldn’t describe it better.

q)Tell us a secret, and obsession.

a)Look at my pictures and I'm sure you will find the answer.

q)Where can people see more of your work on the internet?









giovedì 20 marzo 2014

Interview with JIM LUCIO





q)Walk us through an intimate day in your life

a)A great day will be me getting up at about 6:30am.  The house is always quiet at that time, so I can get some writing done or work on some stuff for the homoarts.com website.
I love to cook, so a good day would include planning and preparing a nice meal that I am hopefully sharing with a few friends--and opening a few bottles of wine.  I also usually try to spend some time in my studio working on my collages.

q) Where did you grow up/where do you live now and how does that contribute to your art?

a)I grew up in Salinas, California which is very close to Monterey and 100 miles south of San Francisco. I’ve spent just about the same amount of years in San Francisco, New York City and now Baltimore; I guess I am inspired by my own movement. The idea of staying in one place too long bores me and I start getting a bit agitated.  Baltimore has contributed more to my overall creativity because there are fewer distractions than larger cities and less of a rat race experience which leaves more time to think about being creative.

q) What is your earliest memory that propelled you to create?

a)I don’t know that this inspired me to create, but I remember as a very young child, looking at a photo of Picasso’s Les Demoiselles d’Avignon and being totally confused and mesmerized by it. I didn’t understand it, but I think I liked it…I couldn’t stop looking at it.  I guess the easy answer is that I always preferred art class to anything else and spent a lot of time drawing, which I never do now.

q) Tell us a little bit about your creative process.

a)As it relates to the collage work I’ve been doing for the last couple of years, it’s been a really rewarding experience to step away from digital design and go completely analog and handmade.

Over the years, I have amassed a pretty large collection of old paper, magazines and various bits of ephemera, so what I typically do is sit at my work table and almost randomly pull something from one of the piles of paper around me and just wait to get inspired by something.  From there it becomes more about finding the right components to add to what I’ve started.  Sometimes things come together quickly and other times it will take hours to find the right little scrap of paper to finish a piece off.
I also start pieces and set them aside until I see a use for incorporating them into something later.  I have a whole bunch of piles and small boxes of half ideas that I can pull from and use when the need arises.  It really is like a puzzle sometimes to make everything fit the way you want it to.

q) How do you wish for your art to be perceived?

a)I look at what I do as my own visual language—like each collage is its own marketing piece. I like to say that I consume and regurgitate everything I take in visually. I translate what I already find in print and turn it into a product or design that is much more appealing to me in its new form.
So, I hope people can see and appreciate the language I am putting forth and enjoy this aesthetic as uniquely my own.

q) What do your internal dialogues sound like?

a)I wish my dog would make me some coffee. I am sick of winter.  What new projects can I start?  What can I make for dinner? I need to update my website and make art.  It’s a continuous cycle of what…where…how…who.

q) Do you feel that there are limitations to what you want to create?

a)Not at all. Currently I am working a lot on my collage work, but my creative output includes photography and events.  I co-ran a gallery in Baltimore for a while and worked as a visual arts director doing major outdoor installations with other artists.  I want to take www.homoarts.com more into the realm of publishing and events and I love collaborating with other artists, so that pretty much leaves all possibilities on the table.

q) Do you feel art is vital to survival and if so, why?

a)It’s vital to MY survival..that’s for sure. It’s just something I need to do. I love helping other artists…promoting their work, talking about it and whatnot, but I also need to produce my own because it’s the pure thing I can offer that is just from me without anyone else fussing over it. It allows me to really ‘check out’… when I am making art it’s the closest I can get to feeling in a zen place. I suck at meditating and this is as close as I can get to it.

q) Describe a world without art.

a)It is joyless. It is not being allowed to creatively thrive when you have something worthwhile to offer. It is soul-crushing to those who need to create and are somehow deprived of it. And for those who say they don’t appreciate it, their worlds would suck if they couldn’t reap the rewards provided by artists.

q) Tell us a secret, and obsession.

a)A secret…for as sociable as I can be, I often prefer to be alone.
I am currently obsessed with reality cooking shows, homoarts.com and getting through all 692 episodes of Prisoner: Cell Block H…they’re all streaming online and I am currently on episode 133!

q) Where can people see more of your work on the internet?

www.homoarts.com is where you can find my work, artist interviews, etc.